Avignon

Sur le Pont d’Avignon On y danse, On y danse Sur le Pont d’Avignon On y danse tous en rond On the bridge of Avignon We all dance there, we all dance there On the bridge of Avignon We all dance there in a ring “Sur le Pont d’Avignon” is a song about the PontContinue reading “Avignon”

Rosslyn Chapel – 5

In 1736, Sir James Sinclair glazed the windows of the chapel for the first time as well as relaying the floor and repairing the roof. However, the chapel was still ruined and was visited in the next 100 years by, amongst others, Robert Burns, Walter Scott, and William Wordsworth, who found the chapel inspirational enoughContinue reading “Rosslyn Chapel – 5”

Malta – 3

Large stones, salt and topsoil have all been postulated as the cargo. The stones might have been the ones used to build the megalithic temples found over the islands and therefore would have had the weight necessary to scrape such channels in the rock, though it is difficult to imagine stones weighing 50 tons beingContinue reading “Malta – 3”

Malta – 2

At different sites over the two main islands and in the surrounding waters are found some man-made features which have been given the name ‘cart ruts’, largely because the first visitors to discover them believed they had been worn by a cart. Their most famous site is at Clapham Junction, named after Britain’s busiest railwayContinue reading “Malta – 2”

Callanish – 4

In his 1726 work on the druids, John Toland specifically identified Diodorus Siculus’ Hyperborea with Lewis, and the “spherical temple” mentioned by Diodorus with the Callanish Stones. Diodorus was a first century BC Greek historian, best known for writing the monumental universal history Bibliotheca historica, much of which survives, between 60 and 30 BC. AContinue reading “Callanish – 4”

Callanish – 3

The stones of the eastern side of the avenue have only three-quarters of the height of the stones on the western side. When I saw this, I wondered whether this was deliberate or just accidental – why would these details be important to the people who created the site? Do we try and provide explanationsContinue reading “Callanish – 3”

Dun Carloway – 3

A path leads up the hillside, giving views of the broch and the surrounding countryside. The side facing you is built above steep rock, and most of it remains as originally designed. As you round the broch to the entrance, on the north side, you are presented with a different picture. From here you canContinue reading “Dun Carloway – 3”

Dun Carloway Broch – 2

The broch is next mentioned in a report by the local Minister in 1797. By this time, brochs were believed to be watchtowers used as defense against, or by, Vikings. Dun Carloway featured prominently in reports on Western Isles brochs in the latter part of the 1800s, and as a result it was one ofContinue reading “Dun Carloway Broch – 2”

Callanish Stone Circle – 2

The 6.4 metre long chambered tomb, in the central part of the circle, was almost certainly added after the circle was set up and was used for many centuries, as not only local pottery was found, but also Beaker vessels dating from 2000BC. The central monolith stands 0.8 metres west of the true centre ofContinue reading “Callanish Stone Circle – 2”

Callanish Stones – 1

After I visit places such as Callanish I am always bewildered, as I am sure that I can’t satisfactorily answer any of the obvious questions – why was it built, how was it built, who built it, what was the reason for building it here rather than on any other hillock in the area? EvenContinue reading “Callanish Stones – 1”