Here are some recent reviews for my book 40 Humourous British Traditions

  1. I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
    From the publisher — Readers will find out a lot about British humour by reading this book.
    Britain has many well documented, yet strange traditions such as Bog Snorkelling, Bonfire Night, Cheese Rolling and Haxey Hood. This book describes 40 more traditions in a similar vein, all of which are less well known. Read about Turtle Rinsing in London, Arrow Catching in Staffordshire, and Animal Gambling in the Forest of Dean. Discover where a Duck Quacking contest, a Pipe Cleaner Festival, and a Thimble Throwing competition take place. Marvel at people’s spitting, blowing, and digging exploits. All the stories are distinct and can be read independently; this is a book for the busy individual who has a spare five or ten minutes to discover the secrets of Biscuit Rolling.
    Britain is known for being full of odd, quirky people, much more so than the US and Canada — but that is what makes them great! These traditions make me wonder WHY some are still going on, but tradition is tradition. Interesting, to say the least!
  2. While rummaging through NetGalley, I came across this one. Again. Maybe the fifth time. I paid it little mind. Why would I? It held little promise. Plain as day, it just wasn’t serious enough. Really? That thought echoed, “Serious enough for what?” I didn’t realize I’d become my own victim. For that, I enjoyed a good laugh at my own expense. Not the first time. A most recognizable voice inside me demanded, “Get the book Paul.” Expletive left out. I listened and finally came to my senses.Now, about the book. Is it character-driven? – NO. Does it have a storyline? – same answer. The usual whodunnit, plots, twists and turns et al., well, there weren’t any. So what was there? Fun storytelling with a pinch of balderdash – without an ending. Just what I wanted! Needed. A pleasant diversion – escape from the regular rigmarole I’ve grown accustomed to. Rigmarole.

    So to Julian Worker, if you’ll excuse me, I must say, “pip pip, tally ho and all that rot”. Thanks mate for a jolly good read!

  3.  I really like this book: it is entertaining and full of humour and curious stories of British tradition.
    I recommended it if you want to be entertained and learn about some curious traditions at the same time.