Excerpt from the book Sports the Olympics Forgot This book describes 40 sports that ought to be played but aren’t, because I made them up.

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The 50-metre and 100-metre men’s events have been dominated by Rod Randall from Cairns, a former squash player with strong wrists who gives the Frisbee a tremendous snap when he releases it. The spin causes the Frisbee to rebound ferociously from the number 5 pin that Randall always aimed at. Randall is the only person to score three strikes in one 100-metre event and his score of 172 in the 50-metre throw in 1987 is still a record for the event.

The 250-metre event attracts the floater Frisbee fans, both male and female, who lob their Frisbee high into the air aiming at the top of the number 1 pin, which then is propelled backwards along with the Frisbee into the other pins. Only three strikes and seven spares have ever been achieved in this event with Sheila Bradman being responsible for all but one of them, Sheila won the combined event nine times in her 37 year career between 1962 and 1998. Her winning total of 78 in 1974 is still a record. In some years when it’s been windy scores below 20 have won the event, with the record low score of 5 winning in 1987.

The obstacle course events take place over the same distances as the straight throw events but different obstacles are placed in the path of the Frisbee in each event. The rules are slightly different in that the Frisbee can hit the ground before hitting the pins and all contestants take part at the same time making it a long event for them all. A contestant can also rebound their Frisbee onto the pins from an obstacle.

The most popular obstacles are walls, the flora and fauna of Australia, and statues of famous Australians made from papier mache. The obstacles are placed in such a manner so as to facilitate amazing rebounds. Few people who saw it will ever forget Michael ‘Ripper’ Warner’s amazing shot in the 1983 100-metre event where he bounced his Frisbee of a kangaroo’s backside, a koala’s ear, and a crocodile’s snout scoring a spectacular strike. Unfortunately, there have been a few embarrassments such as Digby Smith’s stunning beheading of Ned Kelly in the 1973 25-metre event and in 1987 when Fraser Hughes knocked Harold Holt’s statue into the lake attempting a spectacular deflection off Holt’s head into the pins during the 50-metre event. Ironically, Holt’s statue floated out into the lake and was retrieved by the emergency services intact. In 1988 the wall in the 250-metre event was built too close to the pins and nobody scored any points, so the prize money was shared amongst the 50 entrants.