Alefkántra or “Little Venice” is an 18th century district, dominated by grand captains’ mansions with colourful balconies and stylish windows overlooking the waves as they crash onto the shore. .

The second traditional settlement of Mykonos is Áno Merá, situated around the historic monastery of Panayia Tourliani (a 16th century church with a brilliant carved wooden iconostasis). To the north, in Fteliá, lies an important Neolithic settlement, and a 14th-13th century BC Mycenaean tomb.

The Maritime Museum is a small gem. It covers the whole history of ships and shipping with an emphasis on the Greek War of Independence, perhaps not surprisingly. Starting with this war, the walls of one of the rooms are covered in pictures of some of the Greek heroes who took part, including Lord George Byron, the poet. There’s a cross section of a fireship, successfully used by the Greeks against the Ottoman ships of the line. There’s a model of the steamship Karteria, the first steamship ever to take part in a war or naval engagement. There’s also a flag from the sailing ship, Agios Eleftherios, with ‘long live King Otho’ written on the back. The front was similar to the current Greek flag, but the blue had faded.