Other features worth finding are the angel with bagpipes, in the Lady Chapel near the Mason’s Pillar, the Fallen Angel on the eastern wall of the Lady Chapel, and the Lamb of God on the northern wall of the North Aisle, just to the left of the entrance from the Visitor Centre. This Lamb of God was a symbol of the Knights Templar, whose role was to protect pilgrims as they attended the sites in the Holy Land during the period of The Crusades.

Visitors today might find it hard to believe, but Rosslyn has been in ruins for over half of its existence. In 1592 Oliver St Clair was ordered to destroy the altars of Rosslyn, as the church authorities believed the chapel was a ‘house and monument of idolatrie’. After the altars were destroyed, the Chapel ceased to be used as a house of prayer and subsequently fell into disrepair. In 1650, Oliver Cromwell stabled his horses here when he was campaigning in the area.