Extract from Travel Tales from Exotic Places

Laying on the verandah of my hotel the crash of the Atlantic Ocean waves is constant. The view both ways along the coastline shows white-topped waves smashing into the
boulders and beaches. This is Bathsheba on the East coast of Barbados and it’s not visited by many tourists. In the late afternoon there are more people surfing than sitting on the
beach. The waves are gradually eroding many of the rocks that sit proudly on the shoreline and the water has created spectacular sculptures for photographers. With palm trees along the coast and an absence of large-scale development, Bathsheba is an ideal relaxation stop for the busy traveller.

It’s also close to the exceptional Andromeda Botanical Gardens, which are up the hill from the blue-coloured community centre. These are beautiful gardens with views
down to the Atlantic. The Round House Inn is also recommended for its tasty meals with ample portions for the hungry.

Harrison’s Cave is a major tourist attraction in Barbados. After you have paid for your ticket, you can either walk down to the visitor’s centre or take one of the three elevators
that have been strategically placed so they aren’t an eyesore. Outside the centre some hidden tape recorders play the sounds of birds and insects to give the experience a more
natural feel.

The story of how the cave system was created geologically is very interesting indeed as Barbados is made of coral limestone that has been lifted out of the sea by tectonic plate activity. Most other Caribbean islands are the result of volcanic activity. Visitors are taken through the cave system on a land train and it’s probably better to sit on the left hand side as you are taken through the caverns, pools, and small streams that are
found here. Although the stalagmites and stalactites are impressive I believe that the cave is overpriced for what you see.